Handling A “Depressing” Weekend

Sometimes, on this journey to mental health wellness, we get to thinking that we’ve got it made. We start thinking, I’m on top of it, I’m doing all the right things, and I’ve fixed myself. That’s where I was about a week ago. This quarantine has actually been remarkably easier than I expected it to be. I’ve been working out, drinking lots of water, getting enough sleep (for the most part,) eating healthy foods, and taking good care of my brain by not watching a lot of TV and avoiding social media posts that are unproductive or mean. I’ve been super proud of myself for how I’ve handled everything that’s been thrown at me, and I’ll be honest, I started to get a little cocky.

Cue the last five days. Now, I’m going to preface this story with the note that I’m not going to share the details of the “Why” for this event, because one, it’s personal, and two, there are more people than just me involved and it’s not okay to share someone else’s story without their direct input, so you’re just going to have to be okay with that.

So last Thursday I woke up with major depression. I hadn’t been getting enough sleep, or drinking enough water, and I had been spending a significant amount of extra time on social media for the last two days. Apparently two days are all that it takes to shake this “Extra-Strong, I AM WOMAN” mental state I thought I had cultivated. I woke up, and in my bones I knew that my depression was back. I normally get up at 5:30am, but on Thursday, I finally drug my myself out of the comfort of my weighted blanket enhanced sleeping nest at 7:30am. I knew I had to get up because the worst thing you can do when you have depression is to stay in bed all day. So I got up, I made some food, and I drank my pre-workout. I ended up working out, and then going outside and mowing the lawn, as well as rearranging some panels back at our barn. This seems like a lot for someone struggling with depression, and for a lot of people it is, but I’ve fought this beast before, and I’ve got a couple tricks up my sleeve. Depression is afraid of sunlight and hard work, so I went out to give it a dose of both.

It didn’t work.

Friday was exactly the same, hard to get up, hard to get moving, and I wasn’t nearly as successful at getting anything done.

The thing about Depression is, it’s kinda like a video-game monster. When it gets even a little win, it grows stronger. So Saturday I slept in until 8am, snoozing my alarm every 30 minutes, and my depression rejoiced in my lack of discipline to get myself up. I worked Saturday afternoon, and was by myself in my office for a little while which made me feel anxious (ya know, a young woman, alone in an office building, upstairs with no one around… it’s like the beginning of a crappy horror film,) and the depression fed off the anxiety and grew stronger. By Sunday morning, my depression that started out the size of a house cat was now a hippopotamus of doom, and was growling. So I did the worst possible thing I could do, but also the only thing I felt like I could do: I woke up, ate breakfast, and went straight back to bed. I made it to the kitchen table for church, which actually did make me feel a lot better. Win for Kyra, the Depression shrunk to an alligator.

Later Sunday Afternoon, a friend came over to run through some dance stuff that we needed to go over. I really enjoyed getting my dancing shoes on, and Depression shrunk again; I was WINNING!

Alas, it wasn’t meant to be. You know in old video games when the boss starts to shrink and you think you’re winning, and you’re almost to the death swing, and then the enemy pulls out a vial and drinks some potion, or eats some creepy plant, or lands a good blow to your forehead, and all of a sudden, you’re losing? Sunday Afternoon was my Depression’s Poison/Plant/Death Blow moment.

Like I said before, I won’t go into the why. But I will say that conflict ALWAYS escalates mental health issues, especially when you’ve not been focusing on self care like you should. Suddenly, I found myself inside an uncomfortable conflict that I wasn’t expecting, and my depression snapped down onto this opportunity so quickly that I didn’t know what hit me.  I don’t normally cry in my depression, I usually just feel more of an emptiness and a consuming chill, but this time I sobbed my way through Sunday, and into Monday, getting very little sleep, which as we know, makes Depression stronger.

The good news is that we settled the conflict, and worked through it, and the even better news is that I get to look back on this weekend, and see what the takeaways can be about my mental health.

Takeaway #1: Don’t get Cocky
Over the last few months I have been very intentional about my self-care and mental health routines. I’ve been doing everything right, which meant my anxiety and depression were more dormant than they have been in months, and I had allowed myself to become complacent and let my guard down when it comes to my mental health. That means that I stopped taking as good of care of myself as I should be, and I allowed other things in my life to become a priority over my brain. The best example I can think of is the fact that I started watching TV in the evenings with my family, and would often stay up too late watching a show, instead of getting ready and going to bed early enough to practice my sleep hygiene routine. This led to less sleep, which is my first line of defense. If I’m tired, my anxiety and depression immediately seize control. When I am taking good care of myself and my brain, a crisis is still stressful, but it usually doesn’t have the power to send me into a metaphorical pit of despair. By getting cocky, and thinking I didn’t need to take as good of care of myself, I opened myself up to the possibility of a crisis being much more stressful than it would have been if I had been squarely centered in self-care.

Takeaway #2: Sometimes doing the bare minimum is Okay.
I’ve always been a high-achiever, and I feel horrible about myself if I’m not doing at least one thing productive at all times. I can’t even watch a movie without needing to knit or do some other craft that will create something useful. The hardest part of depression for me is the lack of willpower to do absolutely anything. I had heard about a technique used by several different therapists where they instruct people with Depression to gather the energy to do “Just the Next Thing.” I decided to try this on Monday, since I had errands I needed to run and several other projects to get done. I’m happy to say that this method really worked, and even though it was the bare minimum, I still got SOME things done, which made me feel better and not beat myself up so much for not getting anything productive done. I encourage you to try this technique the next time you feel overwhelmed or depressed. The next thing can simply be “Stand up.” Then the next thing might be “Walk to the dresser,” Etc. It was super helpful and I’ll definitely use it again.

Takeaway #3: Don’t Underestimate the Power of Moving Your Body
We know that physical activity is good for us, and gives us endorphines, etc, but how many times when we feel anxious or depressed do we actually turn to a healthy form of exercise as a coping mechanism? I will be the first to say I don’t do that enough. But since I’m currently on a workout program that has assigned days, I didn’t want to miss out or fall behind, so I did my workout even though I didn’t feel like it. It was incredibly helpful and made me feel a lot better, plus BONUS, I got really sweaty, so the hardest task for anyone with depression, taking a shower, became really easy because I was ready for the cool water and to feel clean again!

Takeaway #4: Don’t Allow Others to Steal Your God-Given Joy (The one where I get religious for a minute.)
I’m a Christian, and I fully believe that God gives us an infinite amount of joy in this world. It’s just up to us to seek it and embrace it. Sometimes, we let other people influence our mood or our mental space, and we lose sight of thejoy that is our gift from our Heavenly Father. I learned this weekend that sometimes in the midst of fear and stress and self-doubt, the best thing we can do is reach out for our Father, and ask him to restore our joy. When I relinquished control, andasked Him to wrap me in peace and Joy, I instantly felt better about the situation, and I know that’s what he was asking me to do. The comfort I felt from Him was overwhelming and I knew that He would provide for me, if only I would let go of trying to solve the problem myself and allow Him to work through me. Instead of staying in my bed, where I had retreated in the afternoon, I got up, put on a cute dress and some killer red heels, and went to dinner to celebrate my husband receiving his Doctorate Diploma in the mail yesterday. And you know what? God Answered my prayers and helped to remove the stress and tension from my life, just like He said He would.811F5354-B84C-4C3D-948D-E67DB016A4AF_1_201_a

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